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20131206
20131206
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Al Jazeera America
Dec 6, 2013 12:00am EST
goal of reconciliation. how much of that influenced other civil rights movements - in the u.s., for example. >> well, one of the things that is always interesting is it goes like this - that when you look at the civil rights movement, that it influenced other movements, particularly in south africa, and nelson mandela gave a tremendous amount of encouragement and credit to dr king, and the civil rights struggle. he paid whommage to that. what many don't see, it worked both way, there was an influence of reconciliation. the struggle weighed against apartheid, how he overcame that, but the spirit that nelson mandela governed in south africa and continued to energy us the still rights movement. when it came to los angeles in 1990, i was there and remember the energy from all the civil rights leaders in this city and other parts of the country. they saw nelson mandela not just as a foreign icon. but they saw him as one of them. so really the inspiration from nelson mandela, his leadership had a profound influence on the civil rights movement. >> i was going to ask you how it was
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 10:00pm EST
for the release of a man the symbol of the civil rights movement. finally he walked out of prison. four years later he was elected south africa's first president. let's examine the man behind the status. our first guest had a strong connection. his grandfather taught mandela and his grandmother visited the south african leader in prison. it's a pleasure to have you here. i know you are the headmaster of the groten school. i'm glad you took time on what must be a hard day, given the family connections you had and you know him yourself. >> thank you for having me, i'm honoured to be here and i thank groten school for allowing me to be here. the man would have loved that. >> tell me about your family and connections to nelson mandela. >> my grandfather taught nelson mandela in college in social anthropology. they belonged to the anc, the same organization. my grandmother was also a political leader within the anc. >> and your grandmother then also was close to him and visited him in prison, and nelson mandela wrote her. >> several times, and my grandmother would write back. she told me she wrote
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 8:00pm EST
people that really didn't experience the civil rights movement in the united states. they see this as a landscape of opportunity, and there is room for growth. and so i knew about that, as a young person, in the 90's and i grew up in the south, so in 90s in the south, you can still had a great deal of racial tension. and my parents made sure i knew about nelson, and i think my schoolmates did as welt. >> so it is so personal to so many people. including african-americans in the united states. because there are sort of in some ways parallel tracts. talk about the u.s., and apartheid in south africa, right? >> we picketed with with them. we were there. >> we appreciate it. and president obama has paid tribute to the life of nelson mandela as well. >> that swept college campuses at that time, the first time he ever spoke to a public audience, he had said many times was on behalf of nelson mandela and the antiapartheid movement. he came to the briefing room, he spoke very eloquently. here is more of what he had to say. >> at his trial in 1964. nelson mandela closed a statement fro
FOX News
Dec 5, 2013 6:00pm PST
was just awed by this guy but in person he was more curious about the united states, the civil rights movement in this country than he was interested in talking about himself. again, that's evidence of what a curious mind is, what an open-minded person nelson mandela was. >> he got out of prison in 1990, well after the civil rights movement had undertaken in earnest in this country. he was fascinated by it. do you think he learned from it? >> he certainly did. one of the things that strikes me as you ask the question is that he was asking me about not only the civil rights movement. remember, there is a big difference in south africa the majority is black. in the united states the majority is white. mandela was fascinated with the idea that here in the united states black people were able to have a civil rights move lt and a nonviolent civil rights movement and achieve rights for themselves under the constitution. he was taken with the founding fathers. he knew about it. in south africa you have a majority black population, no constitution, no rights. he was curious how did that black
MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 6:00pm PST
john lewis, democrat of georgia and civil rights leader. mr. lewis, thank you for being with us here tonight on this historic day. >> thank you very much, rachel, for having me, and thank you nar rich history, telling the story, what happened and how it happened. it is very moving. >> i have to ask, after your long career, especially as a young man in the south, in the american civil rights movement, how did nelson mandela's work inform your own? what has he meant to you over the years? what's been the interplay between our civil rights movement and his struggle? >> well, the leadership, the vision, the commitment, the dedication, the inspiration of this one man meant everything to the american civil rights movement. i remember it as a young student in nashville in 1962 and '63 and '64. we said, if nelson mandela can do it, we can do it. we identify with the struggle and when i met him for the first time. he said to me, john lewis, i know all about you. i follow you, you inspired us. and i said, no, mr. mandela, you inspired us. so that was just unbelievable relationship between what
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 10:00am PST
of the years he now was experiencing. >> i was so struck by john lewis saying that as a young civil rights leader and activist, he was so influenced -- he and his fellow college students saying they were so influenced by mandela and mandela saying when they met that he had been following the civil rights movement in the united states. you were front and center as part of that movement, the civil rights movement here. you had that experience also in talking to him, the cross-fertilization of these freedom movements. >> yes, i think they fed off of each other. i think while the united states civil rights movement came of age and its victory much earlier than the apartheid struggle, they were very much alike. i think that's what enabled me, i think, to have the success to the extent i did to have it. i didn't go as a journalist going in an objective way, i was informed by the experiences we had in the south and in the united states. so when i got there, i understand. there were significant differences. in south africa the majority were the black people and they had been suppressed by a minori
FOX News
Dec 6, 2013 2:00pm PST
, almost like he was interviewing me about american politics and the civil rights movement. because in south africa, the majority of the population is black. he wanted to know, wait, how did a minority in the united states achieve civil rights? we ended up talking about, and he's fascinating with the founding fathers. the idea that george washington gives up power one term. something mandela later does. but also citizenship. the whole idea that you have rights in the united states. remember, blacks in south africa had none of that. in a sense, we were inspiring too nelson mandela. >> i'm certain of that. was there anything when you sat down with him that really surpriseded you? i'm sure you prepared ahead of time and researched them and got to know the man through what you were able to read and hear from other personal anecdotes. what did you take away from it? >> i think the thing that surprised me the most is i was saying, you know, mr. mandela, you are a beacon to the world in terms of freedom, struggle, the sacrifice, the 27 years in jail, standing up for principle. he started l
MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 9:00pm PST
rights movement, how did nelson mandela's work form your own? what's been the interplay between our civil rights movement and his struggle? >> the commitment, the dedication, the inspiration of this one man meant everything to the american civil rights movement. i remember it as a young student in nashville in 1962 and '63 and '64. we said if nelson mandela can do it, we can do it. we identify with the struggle. and when i met him for the first time, he said to me, john lewis, i noknow all about you. i follow you. you inspire us. i said no, mr. mandela, you inspire us. so there was this unbelievable relationship between what was happening in america and what would happen in south africa. we would say from time to time the struggle in birmingham, the struggle in selma is inaccept raable from the struggle in sharpville. >> one of the reasons i wanted to talk to you today congressman was reading about and thinking about and trying to understand the importance of those decisions made by mandela and other apartheid leaders after sharpville, when they decided non-violence was not enough, they h
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 1:00am PST
as a young man in if south and the american civil rights movement, how did nelson mandella's work inform you? what's been the interplay between our civil rights movemented and his struggle? >> well, the leadership, the commitment, the dedication, the ings prags of this one man meant everything to the american civil rights movement. i remember as a young student in 1962, '63 and '64, we said if nelson mandella can do it, we can do it. we identify with the struggle. when i met him for the first time, he said to me john lewis, i know all about you. i followed you. >> it was this unbelievable relationship between what was happening in america and what would happen in south africa. the struggle in birmingham is inseparable. trying to understand the importance of those decisions after sharkville, when they decided that nonviolence wasn't enough, they had committed to nonviolence in a way that you had been so committed tlot your life and they decided that they needed that response, as well. how international were those discussions? >> here in america and around the world, there was on going discuss
ABC
Dec 6, 2013 4:00am EST
>>> this morning, the world wakes to the news that a joint of human and civil rights is gone. nelson mandela, a guiding force, reve revered, forever changing history. >> recognize that apartheid has no future. >> he spent nearly three decades in prison, emerging to become the first black president of south africa. a father figure to his people. and to millions around the world. this morning, new reaction from every corner of the world. >> i cannot fully imagine my own life without the example that nelson mandela set. >> right now on "america this morning," abc news remembers nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. ♪ >>> and this morning, the world wakes to news of a giant of human and civil rights gone. nelson mandela, a guiding force for millions, revered for forever changing history. >> she spent nearly three decades in prison, becoming the first black president in south africa. father figure to millions around the globe. >> people around the world are remembering nelson mandela, a symbol of forbearance, peace and dignity. we have pictures from south africa, where pe
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 8:00am PST
in the civil rights and started hearing about what's going on in south africa, some of the leaders of sclc and others would go. it was considered a terrorist far left kind of course. and it was shunned. people would not discuss it in proper mainstream politics. and mandela was considered somebody who was an extreme cause that was in jail and you would see after awhile it evolved into a movement. but it was -- if it had not been for the randall robinsons and the maxine waters and the others that paid a price that built up a movement, a movement of civil disobedience long before it became a cause and started pushing for sanctions and getting artisan athletes to boycott. had it not been because of that movement, it never would have became the movement it was in the united states. >> the national credibility that was lent to it by having those names you mentioned. and charlayne, as you have covered as a journalist, as an activist, you have known nelson mandela since he has been out of prison. and we know that experience certainly like it would for anybody, it changed him. what people don't und
CNN
Dec 5, 2013 5:00pm PST
-racist, non-sexist country which certainly has a compatible legacy in our country's dr. king and civil rights movement here, which it's interesting there was a symbiosis between the civil rights movement and south african movement, they took a tremendous amount of inspiration from dr. king in the civil rights movement in the united states, if you think about 196 3, he went to prison in 1964. >> there is no doubt which gets me to the next question from professor ogletree, in terms of the impact that the anti parti movement around the world had and here in the united states had on the end of a paratide, how significant was it? >> it was very significant. remember, anderson, this was during the regan administration and ronald reagan opposed what we were doing and have towed issues to talk about opening up the system in south africa to end the partide. thousands of people got arrested in washington d.c. and i got a group of lawyers together to represent them for nothing. they were released and not charged with an offense. it was a national issue, black, white, male, female, people on the left, ri
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 11:00pm EST
. >> nelson mandela's life work extended behind the native south africa. we sat with civil rights leader the reverend jessie jackson, and he drew parallels with his movement and the struggle in the u.s. >> there was a sameness about the struggle there and here. both faced persecution in 1953. king was gaoled and bricked and stabbed at 39. nelson mandela was gaoled and put on the terrorist list by the u.s. government and emerged as a moral authority, both have that moral character. barack obama on the other hand - he was the ben factor of the struggles. he's a generation behind. >> nelson mandela and the king were transformative figures. >> we saw a picture of you and nelson mandela with one of my colleagues, morgan radford, who got the chance to meet nelson mandela for the first time. tell me about the man you knew. >> i must say when i was in cape down south africa, he was released. immediately he recognised me and called my name. i was overwhelmed. he knew it was going on. he was current, alive and alert. he didn't just read the speech that day, he wrote it. he also was a great debater
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 11:00am PST
had been partly -- part of a civil rights movement and fought against jim crow, which is our apartheid in america. we appreciated someone who was rising above the situation in south africa so the world could know. for many years their struggle was going on and nobody was listening. >> absolutely. you wrote in your piece on nelson mandela to the very end, he was frail and somewhat forgiveful and remained the father of the nation for south africans and in several trips he made to the hospital over the past two years, he was in his own way preparing his family biological and extended, for his final return home. he was 95. we know this life is not permanent in this form here. when you -- the news broke, despite his age and despite knowing his health situation, no one wanted to let him go for what he represented, even though that continues as he's passed away. >> i think so many people wish it could continue even more intensely. but i've got rn e-mails from friends in south africa who were doctor and people who like you said watched his progression and they say even though -- they've been w
CNN
Dec 6, 2013 9:00am PST
that will nelson mandela set. >> want to bring in andrew young, civil rights leader and former ambassador to the united nations. welcome, as well as james joseph, former u.s. ambassador to south africa and duke university professor, both of who new mandela very well on a personal level. ambassador, i'd like to start with you. you draw parallels. you talk about how this was so important, so significant in some ways to the civil rights movement and the struggle at the time. for us, i was a college student when we had a lot of those divest from the from the south africa shantytowns in the yards of the campuses. tell us the connected you had with the civil rights movement. >> understood that as dr. king said, injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. and so we knew of chief albert la tooley and the african national crisis. we entertained oliver tambo and mbeki when they were in exile. but my first real conflict, i went to south africa with arthur ashe in 1974 to play tennis. we tried to seaman della and didn't but we saw robert subuqwai who had just gotten out of jail and we start
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 3:00am PST
's incomparable. one of us that grew up in the post-civil rights era it tempered a lot of us that got to know him. the mandela way was not only to fight for change but become the change and he symbolized that in epic proportions. few times i was honored to be around him, you were always moved by this balance of gravity and humility, you never saw in anyone else. he was such a humble and great guy at the same time. it is really something that we probably, president obama said, we'll never see again. >> john meacham, i was talking to my 10-year-old girl about nelson mandela, explaining about him, what he had done, the sacrifices he made, the way he changed this country and the world. i'm wondering, though, of course, my 10-year-old girl didn't know an awful lot about nelson mandela. and we won't even talk about my 5-year-old boy. he'll get it in years to come. what do history books write about this man? >> the last lines of the 20th century. he was arguably with john paul ii, martin luther king, he was someone without whom the world would be radically different and worse. while america mourns him t
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 9:00pm EST
, but those that work for freedom and civil rights across the world. we begin with the great man's own words. the ones we will all remember of him. >> difficulties he once wrote to his wife, wreak some men. but make others. real leaders, he said, must be ready to sacrifice all, for the freedom of their people. i can rest only for a moment before with freedom, come responsibility and i dare not linger for my long walk is not yet ended. his long walk ended today, as he died at the age of 95. this is the moment of deeper sorrow. yet what made him great is what made him human. we saw in him what we seek in ourselves. >> looking back now to the headdy days in 1990, and the days after that, the excitement throughout the world even the months after that, leaf him here in the wrights. joining us here in the studio, she helped to organize nelson mandela's first tour after he was released from prison, and it was really quite soon after his release, can you take us back to that moment? it is june of 1990, and america is seeing nelson mandela, how emotional was it here? >> it was really pan polonium. it
KICU
Dec 6, 2013 4:00am PST
to the civil rights movement. now turning to sad news about one of the ultimate civil rights pioneers -- nelson mandela, an enduring world icon of peaceful resistance, has died mandela famously led south africa, out of apartheid. he spent 27 years in prison after being convicted by a white minority government. he was released in 19-90 and went on to became south africa's first black president in 1994. while in office, the economy nearly doubled. mandela died late yesterday. he was 95. friday is funday at first business. here to lighten the mood and enlighten us-- from the floor of cme group alan knuckman and scott shellady. they are ready to go for traders unplugged. good morning and topic number one: bears snared? corporate profits are at all time highs, stocks are sustaining near record levels-- are the bears growling? alan: my friend here is a market atheist.i know he doesn't believe. but if you look at the pe ratio at 19 and a half versus the record in 2000 was 26. we still have a long ways to go and the profits tell the story whether you like it or not. scott: i think that you have to real
CBS
Dec 5, 2013 5:30pm PST
among some of the biggest civil right ises advocates. brown hosted him in his civil rights tour after he got out of prison. >> mandela came here in 1990, and 70,000 packed into the coliseum to see their hero and receive thanks for his activism. >> it is you, the people of the bay area, who have given me and my dedication hopes to continue to prosper. >> the bay area choir who performed for him in south africa
CNN
Dec 5, 2013 4:00pm PST
luther king jr. and the country's civil rights and you were on south africa on the day mandela walked out of prison. tell us about that moment. >> you know, it was a moment difficult to describe. he took us on unbelievable heights of joy that day. and the depths of pain. a huge larger than life figure. i've gotten into south africa quite by chance in 1979 and connected with his family and we instructed in the 1990. and we had the feeling he would be released this weekend so my son and i met him there. what surprised me was he recognized me and call my name. he had seen the convention speech from the democratic convention. he came out and stopped. i'm sure the governor will say that he was unbelievably slumped. he came out not just reading speeches but up for debate. >> what do you think his enduring legacy will be around the world? is it the concept that i've heard you speak? the concept of forgiveness and reconciliation? >> i think it is the thing everybody says. that he was the true towering moral figure of our time. why do people say that he is the leader that they most respect? everyb
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 7:00pm EST
president. you looking at the scene. a man who became a towering symbol for civil rights for strength, for unity. >> days to come, we will bring you extensive coverage, detailed coverage of his life, president obama spoke about mandela minutes after his death was announced, here is what he said. >> we will not likely see the likes of nelson mandela again. so it falls to us to be the example he set, to make decisions guarded not by haste, but by love. never discount the difference that one person can make. strive for a future that is worthy of his sacrifice. >> . >> right now let's pause and give thanks the r the fact that nelson mandela lived, a pan who took history, in his hands. bent the arc of the moral universes towards justice, may god bless his memory, and keep him at peace. >> the president of the united states, again, live pictures in outside nelson mandela's home tonight, and here in new york, a live picture of the apollo theater, the same the venue in harlem, tonight the marque honors nelson mandela. here is a picture of the marque, we are getting ready for a live shot. we h
PBS
Dec 6, 2013 6:30am PST
is a key player in the civil rights movement. jenna was an inspiration to end users importantly this morning to get a tree. as for the basic colors. nichole. which even the least arguable that you can overcome any obstacles that anyone rushing off to bible cause of the checks dentist told us all montana's is it. and the cement that was coming he really. he was lying. i just felt really very proud to be havin guy to be an african american to be decades before the anti apartheid. i checked his pulse to toe with steve johnson says he will continue to preach about this is done for monday. these rates move continued to my earn more and more and more about twelve we used to symbolize to try it on monday as nineteen ninety four visits. he came back to holland began to show solidarity. can americans once again produced. i would stick to it now and how people are reacting on the internet to mandela isn't that an event run by shannon bennett ran on china but every scene. well i feel are taking to twitter especially this painting daily list of reactions than on basically every minute burie
KBCW
Dec 5, 2013 10:00pm PST
a dream. some say nelson mandela dreamed it. he became one of the greatest civil rights icons of the last 50 years and it cost him almost three decades of his life in a jail cell. vanita on the man who earned the admiration of millions. >> and one wonders what must be passing through mr. mandela's mind at this moment. >> after 27 years in prison, nelson mandela walked into freedom. against all odds, the leader of a rebellion became the leader of national unity. mandela's decade-long rebellion turned him into a freedom fighter, an international hero. >> i fought against white domination. i have fought for every family. >> mandela was born into a privileged family. he supported nonviolence. he became a lawyer and opened the first african law firm. in 1960, mandela turned militant. >> there are many people who feel that it is useless for us to continue talking nonviolence. >> mandela loved up to his name, troublemaker, repeatedly challenging authority. he was convicted of sabotage and conspiracy to overthrow the government and sentence to life in prison. he was cut off from the outside
ABC
Dec 6, 2013 7:00am PST
of the apartheid foe and civil rights icon, nelson mandela. we continue that, just ahead. ♪ we know we're not the center of your life, but we'll do our best to help you connect to what is. ♪ [ male announcer ] laura's heart attack didn't come with a warning. today her doctor has her on a bayer aspirin regimen to help reduce the risk of another one. if you've had a heart attack, be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. you know that, right? uh-huh. i know this hasn't always been easy for you. and i'm really happy that you're in my life too. ♪ it's just like yours, mom! [ jane ] behind every open heart is a story. tell yours with my open hearts collection at kay jewelers, the number one jewelry store in america. there are millions of reasons to give one, but the message is always the same. keep your heart open... and love will always find its way in. thank you. thank you. ♪ every kiss begins with kay thank you. ♪ feed them natural and healthy blue™ buffalo, like family, featuring lifesource® bits that are now enhanced with our super 7 package of natu
LINKTV
Dec 6, 2013 2:00pm PST
. in the 1960s during the civil rights and anti-war movements, music became a driving force in the struggle for social change. (seeger) there wasn't a single meeting that didn't have singing. "we shall overcome" was the most famous song, but there were hundreds of others. they'd change over a gospel song, put new words to it. very common technique. it's been done for centuries. "we shall overcome" was originally a fast song. [clapping] ♪ i'll overcome. ♪ i'll overcome someday. ♪ we shall overcome. when you sing "we shall overcome," your shoulders are touching because you're crossing your arms in front of you, and swaying across from right to left. [softly] ♪ we shall overcome. well, a month after the founding of sncc, this song was sung throughout the whole south. it was the song; it wasn't a song; it was the song. in it's own quiet way, it was taking confidence. you can kill me, you can beat me, but i know we shall overcome. (scott-mclaughlin) in the prisons, they would sing songs. when they we're being beaten by the dogs, they would sing songs. and you'd have to ask yourself what
FOX
Dec 5, 2013 6:00pm PST
years in prison. he later became president of south africa and a symbol of resistance in civil rights. >> he had no permanent enemies. he dealt with issues. >> reporter: a poster of nelson mandela hangs high. the store sold out of his autobiography and other books about him. >> reporter: nelson mandela won the nobel prize and raised millions of dollars for humanitarian causes and remains a inspiration to younger generations. >> made me want to know more about my people. >> reporter: nelson mandela once said people learn to hate and if they can learn to hate they can be taught to love. reporting live, rob roth, ktvu channel 2 news. >> nelson mandela was 95 years old. he had been ill for more than a year. he passed peacefully surrounded by family. >>> the b.a.r.t. board of director had a lot to discuss today, one day after a train stranded passengers. ktvu's john sasaki was at the meeting where they were discussing the accident and also the labor dispute that is still going on. >> reporter: this has been a tough year for b.a.r.t. and the riders. one day after the train was stuck in the
PBS
Dec 5, 2013 4:00pm PST
will see over the coming days. people in the civil rights movement looked towards south africa and felt the pride in seeing a black president in place. america's first black president paid tribute to the fierce dignity, as he called it, of nelson mandela. he took a great lesson from that. nelson mandela no longer belongs to us but to the ages. he said that is not the lessons of all addicts but of people in their own personal lives. decisions should be guided, not by hate but by love. a quote from echo martin luther king. he said, he took history in his hands and bent the moral half of the universe. >> we have been reporting the death of former president mandela in south africa at the age of 95. increasingly frail in recent months. lots of concern about his health over the past two or three years. presidentnnounced by zuma about 45 minutes ago. looking atnt, we are the death of nelson mandela on bbc news. south africa's ruling african national congress has said that the world lost a colossus and the epitome of quality, justice, and peace. nelson mandela immersed himself in a campaign for
ABC
Dec 5, 2013 11:00pm EST
the civil rights icon. >> they think about the usedings of gandhi, and he them to free the south african people. -- and he was here was freed from the south african prison. >> he represented so much to the world. >> tomorrow morning, the deputy ambassador will open up the fence so they can get closer to the statue, with the condolence book for everyone to sign. >> thank you very much. howard university has a vigil in his honor tonight, to give the community a place to gather. stay with abc seven and lbj l.a..com, -- wjla.com, for "good morning washington" tomorrow morning. we turn to breaking news out of prince george county. we have live pictures from news chap -- news chopper seven. asphalt,t laurel authorities tell us, two hazmat containers are on fire there. and to the other story we are watching tonight, the weather. there are big changes coming our way. we have more on what we can expect. >> it is still 63 degrees, late at night here, outside of the weather center, let's check out the doppler radar. showers, few more especially to the midday afternoon evening. ahead of a very stron
PBS
Dec 5, 2013 6:00pm PST
as director of the southern africa project of the lawyers committee for civil rights under law. douglas foster is the author of "after mandela: the struggle for freedom in post-apartheid south africa." he's an associate professor at northwestern university's medill school of journalism. donald gibb and john stremlau is vice president for peace programs at the carter center. he taught at the university of the witwatersrand in johannesburg. >> welcome to you all.gay mcdour first reaction tonight on hearing of the loss of nelson mandela? >> well, i'm terribly sad.of co. we knew it was coming. but nevertheless, it is a shock. and it's quite sad thing. i think first of all, the people of south africa who would be mourning in a very special way, but i think all around the world has lost a hero, a hero that we desperately needed, when he came forward and faif us hope. >> -- gave us hope. >> as we continue thisconversat. we do want to say to local stations that we are not going to be taking a break tonight so we can continue to discuss nelson mandela's life and legacy. and i want to pick up with you p
ABC
Dec 6, 2013 6:00am PST
as a memorial, cars and candles in honor of the civil rights leader and politician who passed away at the aim -- age of 95. >> republican to's embattled mayor is criticizing president obama. mayor ford is denowing the health care laissezzing affordable care -- saying affordable care act is too expensive in spite of california having a government-run health care system. as a person, he said, i live but i don't like his policies. >> if you are looking for a perfect gift, california officials have a suggestion, health insurance. the sack -- "sacramento bee" says "give the gift of health aimed at mothers and grandmothers would could look to buy health insurance for uninsured young adults. >> some are sounding off as a new baby bouncy seat with an ipad holder. the company released this video showing how it works. they are selling the app for $80 and says it offers play and learning at a baby's fingertips but some are disgusted. shoppers on amazon have called it "one of the worst ideas for baby products." >> amazon is widely expected to lunch a new delivery service next week for groceries. all sign
NBC
Dec 5, 2013 6:00pm PST
't remember much about the civil rights movement don't remember much about his life. they know what he stood for. i think, you know, today in south africa, even when people wake up in the morning because most people don't know he's transitioned and i use that word because in south africa, people don't talk about death and dying. they talk about transitioning and it's a happy time, and i'm sure they're going to be celebrating his life. i hope they will be teaching, teaching, teaching what nelson mandela stood for. this is a moment to teach. it's a teachable moment. as much as it is a moment to reflect and think about what nelson mandela has meant to the world and to these young people who can sing in that neighborhood where they used to not even be able to go without a pass, the black ones. it's that kind of thing that nelson mandela did away with that we need to remember. those young people could not have gone into that neighborhood a this time of night without a pass before nelson mandela and his people liberated the country. so that's what they're, you know, representing now. >> charlayne,
CBS
Dec 5, 2013 6:00pm PST
him among some of the biggest civil right ises advocates. brown hosted him in his civil rights tour after he got out of prison. >> mandela came here in 1990, and 70,000 packed into the coliseum to see their hero and receive thanks for his activism. >> it is you, the people of the bay area, who have given me and my dedication hopes to continue to prosper. >> the bay area choir who performed for him in south africa will be live at 6:30. >>> the man who paid a lot of money to combat -- tenure and the mark he leaves behind. >> reporter: the so-called supercop is back in new york. the mayor elect named william braton the job he had under giuliani. >> this is a beacon of light for the rest of world. >> reporter: his record of cleaning up crime was what attracted the oakland officials, paying him $250,000 to tell them how to tackle crime here. a year-long contract job that ended a month ago. >> i think what bill did was that he came in and he watched how we were implementing different things, from time to time, our crime analysis. even though you can do the form of it, do you do the heart
MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 7:00pm PST
the context in which he lived. you had the inverse in the civil rights movement. you had a native african population that was seven times larger than the ruling class that essentially turned them and enslaved them in their own country. they were made a third-class citizen, a noncitizen, a nonperson within a land that they called their ancestoral home and they tried to fight apartheid and oppression in certain ways, sometimes through revolutionary struggle, violent struggle. they would try nonviolence and they would be met with incredible, intense violence. the amount of violence that it took to suppress this large african population was incredible. so what mandela for gave is something that is almost indescribable for most people and i think for a lot of african-americans, this was the struggle for a lot of campuses that came after the generation of vietnam. so you have the civil rights struggle, which was the 1960s, the big young people's revolution. then you had the fight against vietnam. but for a lot of people, particularly in the 1980s, it was this. it was the fight against apartheid
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 9:00am PST
in america, so much of the american civil rights movement was reminding african-americans and still is, reminding young children of color, you are equal, you do deserve the exact same things. i think that made a huge difference. >> i think part of that was if you understand he was born in royalty. he was born to a certain manner. his self-concept, he that naturally and he never lost it. because he didn't have that insecurity, he didn't need all that to become a leader. his vanity never outran his sanity. >> talking about the legacy of nelson mandela, we're talking about how those qualities of grace, dignity, humility have been inherited or visited on later generations. i want to play an excerpt from your interview with the president last night where he himself takes a remarkably humble posture as far as being commander in chief, president of the united states. lets take a listen to that. >> the interesting thing about now having been president for five years. it makes you humbler as opposed to cockier as to what you as an individual can do. you recognize you're just part of the sweep o
PBS
Dec 5, 2013 8:00pm PST
citizens should also mention that this movement has a lot of support might get lots of civil rights groups community leaders even when you're sitting here at lax fields of law seo has voiced his support for reducing the minimum wage as you can see this is that fuel which movements in the united states taking place in day out the extent they're going from location to location and name calling them as they continue walking. reporting from the dark green up when i r t. rapper great scientists and rescue crews are desperately attempting to save the crew of beached whales. the group of pilot whales is stranded off the shoreline of everglades national park in southern florida. at least ten whales have ninety six of natural causes and four of them were euthanized. for more from florida. rt is an incline so donovan reports. the last couple of days of being very sad day this to be down here on the shoals of the southern florida on wednesday the whole the news spread out but the very large group of up to forty five pilot whales stranded themselves off the shoals of the candidates national park. mari
ABC
Dec 5, 2013 4:00pm PST
. >> this announcement made this afternoon by the south african president jacob assume zuma. >> the civil rights legend passed away at age 95. mandela had become a symbol of triumph after spending 27 years in prison trying to end racial and political segregation in his country. >> i have cherished the idea of a democratic and free society. it is an idea for when ch i am prepared to die. >> nelson mandela was the country's first black president just as president obama was the first in the united states the two did meet face-to-face, but not while leaders today, president obama says nelson mandela was his inspiration. >> today, he's gone home we've lost one of the most influential, and pro foundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> president obama is expected to travel to south after rick why for the funeral. >> this is a scene just minutes ago in south africa. a crowd gathered outside of nelson mandel' home. some have put on the south african flag during this remembrance. >> the impact on his country cannot be over
ABC
Dec 5, 2013 5:30pm PST
was a student of gandhi. martin luther king, america's civil rights movement. i think it's fair to say that history will show the student became the teacher. america the world, his classroom. >> every individual life has a lesson. >> yes. >> thank you so much, byron. >>> still ahead on this special edition of "world news," you're going to meet mandela's jailer, a country boy who became a lifelong friend. that's ahead. ♪ [ male announcer ] your eyes. even at a distance of 10 miles... the length of 146 football fields... they can see the light of a single candle. your eyes are amazing. look after them with centrum silver. multivitamins with lutein and vitamins a, c, and e to support healthy eyes and packed with key nutrients to support your heart and brain, too. centrum silver. for the most amazing parts of you. ♪ >>> nelson mandela standing inside the cell that once held him prisoner and mandela walked out of prison with a lesson for living, saying to walk free is not merely to cast off change but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others. he did something be
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 2:30am PST
at a concert in his honor. meeting with world leaders and his civil rights hero. >> so help me god. >> reporter: as promised, he stepped down as president of south africa after serving just one term. >> south africa has been a despotic state through almost the whole of the 20th century. mandela's legacy stands against it. that is one of the best and most optimistic qualities that he hands to the people of south africa. >> reporter: by all accounts, the measure of this man can be taken by what he wants to be remembered for. here lies nelson mandela said, a man whos has done his duty on earth. >> keith miller reporting. joining us the council on foreign relations richard haas. we talk a lot in vague terms how iconic and important he was. can you somehow crystallize it from a global perspective, his impact? >> just imagine if nelson mandela had been a different kind of person and south africa had gone into a bloody race war in which apartheid didn't end peacefully, but instead, had been a violent transition in which hundreds of thousands of people had died simply because of race. imagine what that
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2013 12:00pm EST
civil rights agenda with education, choice, voting rights no one life should be ruined because of a youthful mistake. no one should be thrown in but themselves. no one should lose their voting rights because they spent time in prison. it does us no good to create jobs for young people in detroit if they can't later get such jobs because of out of control war on drugs. .... they should be able to vote and have a life and build a family. their children should look at what comes from happiness and hard work. we talk about the family unit owing down the drain, and we are preventing families from going back to the. we must address the federal mindset that values our rest rates. it is not because white kids in affluent suburbs are not also smoking pot, it is they tend to be arrested and do not have as good representation and the police gravitate there because it is easier. it has been going on for a long time. it is not a purposeful racism, but we have a racial return on the war on drugs that is not fair. minority communities are easy targets. some say that is good politics. maybe it
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 12:00am PST
of americans compared south africa to the u.s. and thought in terms -- >> jim crow. >> the civil rights movement, where people's rights were being violated. in south africa, there was no constitution and there were no rights. so apartheid was really a labor system, a way of controlling black workers to the benefit of the people who owned the mines and the resources of that country. and so the whole system regulated people's lives, almost in every dimension, where they could live, where they could work, and they couldn't violate those rules. they couldn't be in the city after dark. they couldn't, you know, work in certain areas. it was a tightly regulated, really a fascist, to use a word that we don't use much anymore. it's that kind of a white nationalist regime. >> i mean, there were -- and we should just say, there were secret police. during nelson mandela's imprisonment, it was illegal to have a picture of him, right? these are -- >> it's all true, chris. >> it couldn't put it in a newspaper. they couldn't put his face or name in a newspaper. >> a lot of us forget that the united sta
FOX News
Dec 6, 2013 10:00am PST
of apartheid south africa. they struck a deal where by civil rights and democracy came immediately. property rights were respected. a truth of reconciliation commission established under archbishop tutu which allowed south africans of all races to confront their past, but without recriminations that would have made relations poisonous. which was independence, freedom and democracy and equality for all south africans. i think that's really the example of his statesman ship and his vision. >> absolutely. south africa could never have gotten there without all those things you just pointed out. thanks so much. >> years ago, you in new york had an experience to spend time with nelson mandela. >> i did. there was a town hall meeting, i helped book hundreds of people in harlem who wanted to come when his first visit here in 1990, when nelson mandela came and i was so struck by his understated, yet ree gal presence and to listen to him speak, he was very unpolitically correct. he didn't shy away from them, but just to be around somebody who personified forgiveness was a very special experience. >> a
CNN
Dec 6, 2013 6:00am PST
at it as almost a proxy for what had happened in america during the civil rights movement and i think it awakened and it was a revelation for many, many americans. >> i'm sure president obama and i'm sure you'll agree was deeply disappointed when he was in south africa earlier this year, with his family, he was not able to go and meet president mandela, because he was so gravely ill. i'm sure he would have loved to have done that, but he obviously couldn't. he'll head to south africa in the coming days for the funeral, this will be an important event not only for president obama but for the united states. >> yes, and again, wolf, mandela has not been himself for a number of years. i think it was understandable he wasn't able to meet with the president. mandela say man of such great pride. the last few years when his memory was failing him, he felt awkward, seeing people, but i do think it's a great opportunity for president obama, president obama has had an important and deep focus on africa, the young african leaders initiative that he started as something that he cares a great deal about, so i
CNN
Dec 5, 2013 10:00pm PST
. the president and iconic champion of civil rights died thursday age 95 after years of illness. he was at his home in johannesburg surrounded by family. south african president jacob zuma said our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost a father. mandela's hospital has been moved. this is the scene right outside mandela's home there in johannesburg in the out market neighborhood. you can see right now people are laying flowers and to bring tribute to the man widely seen as the father of modern south africa. he was president for five years. he stepped down, has not been president for 14 years but remains very much in the heart of so many people there. this news came later than night south african time and so right now as this country wakes up, 34 minutes past 8:00, many people are learning nelson mandela is at rest. >> and, of course, mandela accomplished so many great things. he was the father of a nation. he led south africa through its battle against oppression and on to democracy and it kept him away from home. he also stayed very close to his family as we've mentioned our r
CNN
Dec 6, 2013 1:00am PST
. he stood for the civil rights, not just people in south africa but people around the world and his legacy goes on. >> reporter: people here continuing to leave notes. one of them read, thank you for creating a pathway to freedom for all of us, a message that is being heard here and in other countries as well. michaela? >> very moving indeed. erin mclaughlin, thank you for that. >> the tributes are pouring in from all over the world this morning. president obama had some very, very poignant words to honor the late president of south africa. he actually invoked words that were used at president lincoln's funeral. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. through his fierce dignity and bending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, madiba transformed south africa and moved all of us. his journey from a prisoner to a president embodied the presence that human beings and countries can change for the better. his commitment to transfer pour and reconcile for those who jailed him set an example that all humanity took inspire to whether the lives of nation
MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 10:00pm PST
in the american civil rights movement. you had a native african population that was seven times larger than the ruling class that essentially turned them and enslaved them in their own country. they were need not even a second, a third class citizen, a non-person within a land that they called their anses tral home. and the national african congress and nelson mandela tried to fight this oppression in various ways. sometimes through violent struggle. they would try non-violence. they were met with incredible violence. it was intense and incredible. so what mandela forgave is something that is almost indescribable for many. this is what came after the generation of vietnam. then you had the fight against vietnam. but for a lot of people, particularly in the 1980s, it was this. it was the fight against apartheid in south africa that galvanized a lot of african-americans. >> i asked the last word staff today for a show of hands of how many personally remember apartheid and very few hands went up. i was at your class at columbia, and i can tell with your students, they don't remember apartheid.
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 6:00am PST
civil rights movement and after the vietnam war movement, college campuses in the 80s erupted over the apartheid movement. the administration of ronald reagan finally was the first veto override on foreign policy. it was rejected and taken over as jim baker said on "morning joe." taken over by congress. >> why do you think the world was slow when it came to dealing with south africa? >> i have to say that we in the media are partly to blame. we didn't focus that much on what was going on in south africa. until it just became impossible to ignore. when i went the first time in 1985, it was actually the first time that we focused on the people of south africa. both the black and the white and what the human beings of the country were thinking. why the white people thought they were superior to the blacks and did they ever see an end to that thinking? how the blacks were struggling on every level, not just in the streets, but offices where many of them worked. it was initially focusing on the overall idea of those who are fighting against oppression and those who are pressing. we didn
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 3:00pm PST
these struggles were and how to fight opposition. i mean, i've been in the civil rights fight for the last several decades. and i remember the beginnings of the fight against apartheid here. robinson and gray and others who were castigated and attacked for that. and they were able to turn public opinion around. having to fight people like dick cheney and others who are now with these great eulogies on nelson mandela. >> that's right. i think people forget that. when people like you and mary francis berry were in the beginning of that fight, it was demonized and you were attacked for that. and it was not a popular position. and so i think there's a lot about the history that people. he oversimplifies everything. so does rush limbaugh. they don't care about what the facts are. that is here is a man who stood for justice, stood for freedom, stood for equality. we have a president who seems to -- i'm not saying he is nelson mandela, but he seems to be trying to accomplish some of the same things. >> karen finney, well, he's getting called some of the same names. thank you for your time tonight. be sur
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